Mocktails

Over the past few months of pregnancy, I have begun to embrace mocktails: delicious non-alcoholic beverages made with a variety of ingredients, much like a regular cocktail. This way, I can still have a drink with nuanced flavor, while feeling like I’m part of the festivities during social gatherings.

IMG_1707Blackberry and green plum spritz: For this drink I used a Korean green plum extract to give the drink some sweetness and extra flavor. Paired with muddled blackberries for tartness and just a splash of sparkling water, it makes a refreshing drink that isn’t too sweet.

Instructions: Muddle 4 blackberries with 1 oz of green plum extract in a glass. Add ice and top with sparkling water.

IMG_1709Mocktail Moscow Mule: This drink follows a basic Moscow mule recipe, but without the vodka. I like to add lots of lime juice, which is not only tasty but has also been a great aid with morning sickness the last few months.

Instructions: Juice a small lime and add to a copper mug along with a few sprigs of fresh mint. Add ice and fill mug with ginger beer of choice.

IMG_1710Coconut and pineapple daiquiri: I love tropical fruits, and tiki cocktails are some of my favorites. Most tiki drinks are made up of fruit juices and syrups with the addition of rums.

Instructions: 1/2 cup frozen pineapple pieces, 1/2 cup coconut milk, 1.5 oz orange juice, 1 oz grenadine, 1 oz almond syrup (can be made by making a 1/4 cup of simple syrup with 1tsp of almond extract). Add all of the ingredients to a blender and blend until smooth.

 

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We are thrilled to announce that a new Baby Dastoli will be arriving in March!


Coconut Rice

IMG_1695I remember going through a phase as a child when I didn’t like coconut at all. I don’t quite remember when that changed, but it’s safe to say that I now love all things coconut flavored, sweet and savory. Though savory coconut is not as common, this coconut rice with red beans and a little bit of jalapeño spice is one of my favorite rice side dishes.

IMG_1696Ingredients: 1 1/2 cups white rice, 1 jalapeño, 5 sprigs of thyme, 1 tbsp olive oil, 1 can coconut milk, 1 can red kidney beans, salt and pepper to taste.

IMG_1684Instructions: Add olive oil to a pot with lid or dutch oven over medium heat. Remove seeds from jalapeño and slice, add to pot along with thyme and lightly sauté. Add rice and mix until rice is lightly coated with olive oil. Sauté rice until just starting to get toasty and aromatic.

Add can of coconut milk, about half the can worth of water, beans, salt and pepper. Stir gently to combine ingredients, cover, and lower heat. Cook for about 35 minutes, until liquid is gone and rice is cooked through.

IMG_1691You can serve it as a side to any meal, but I especially love pairing it with a hearty meat dish and relaxing on the patio on a summer evening.

 

 


Mushroom Ravioli

IMG_1683Ever since getting the pasta attachment for my stand mixer, I have been dabbling in making homemade pasta. I especially love preparing fresh pasta for guests, or for a romantic date night in. Ravioli in particular can be a perfect special dinner for two without spending the money on going out to a restaurant. This mushroom ravioli, stuffed with a creamy mushroom filling and covered with an herby mushroom sauce, is one of our absolute favorites.

IMG_1670IMG_1673For the pasta: 5oz flour, 1/2 tsp salt, 1 whole egg, 2 egg yolks (reserve one egg white for later).

Add all ingredients to the bowl of a stand mixer with dough hook and mix for about 10 minutes. All of the ingredients will come together to form a ball and hook will knead the dough until it is smooth and shiny. Wrap dough in plastic, and let sit for at least one hour. When dough has rested, cut in half and roughly shape each piece into rectangles, flattening with the palm of your hand, and lightly dust with flour. Run each piece of dough through the pasta attachment, starting on setting 1 and gradually making your way to 5. I like to run the dough through each number about 3 times. Once each piece has gone through setting 5 at least twice, cut each strip in half and rest on a baking sheet lightly dusted with flour until ready to use.

IMG_1675For the filling: 1 tsp olive oil, 2 1/2 cups roughly diced mushrooms (any kind and combination you’d like), 1 small diced shallot, 2 diced garlic cloves, 4 sprigs fresh thyme, 1 tbsp butter, 3/4 cup ricotta cheese, 1/2 cup parmesan cheese

While the dough is resting you can start making the ravioli filling. Heat olive oil in skillet and add shallots and garlic. Sauté shallots and garlic until starting to lightly brown, then add mushrooms and thyme. Lower heat to low and let simmer gently until mushrooms are cooked through. Add butter and salt and pepper to taste. Remove the thyme sprigs and let the mushrooms cool, then add to a bowl with ricotta and parmesan cheeses. Mix until thoroughly combined.

IMG_1676IMG_1677To make the ravioli, lay out the sheets of pasta and place about a tablespoon for each ravioli of mushroom filling along the sheet. Brush with egg whites along the edges of the filling. Cover with the second half of the pasta, then gently press around the edges of the filling to seal each ravioli and remove air.

IMG_1678Using a ravioli stamp press each ravioli along the edges to give them their proper shape. Gently pull each ravioli apart and set aside. Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil and cook ravioli for about 3 minutes, until they all float to top. Remove with a slotted spoon and place on plates.

IMG_1681For the sauce: 1 tsp olive oil, 1 garlic clove, 1 cup sliced mushrooms, 1 cup chicken broth, 2 tbsp minced parsley, 1 tbsp butter

Heat olive oil in skillet and add garlic. Add mushrooms and sauté for a couple of minutes, until mushrooms start to lightly brown. Add chicken broth and parsley and let simmer until broth has reduced by about half. Add butter and salt and pepper to taste, mix well.

IMG_1682Drizzle mushroom sauce over freshly made ravioli, and garnish with fresh parsley to complete the dish.

 

 


Kyōto

IMG_1269There are many beautiful sights in the city of Kyōto, which is just a few hours ride on the Shinkansen from Tōkyō. When planning, we aimed for our trip to coincide with the blooming of sakura. Luckily, we arrived right on time, and Kyōto offered a myriad of places to view them.

IMG_1412The wooden lattices and paper dividers in our room at Hotel Kanra create an atmosphere of elegant simplicity reminiscent of the ancient capital. There was even a wooden bathtub made of Japanese cypress that we soaked in each evening we were there.

IMG_1289IMG_1317IMG_1288A great place for hanami (the viewing of sakura) is the Shirakawa Canal in the geisha district of Gion.

IMG_1349IMG_1358The path to Kiyomizu-dera through Ninen-zaka and Sannen-zaka is absolutely breathtaking. Traditional machiya line the narrow stone lane as it slopes up the hill from one pagoda to another.

IMG_1340Ishibei-koji is a beautifully preserved quiet lane in the Higashiyama district that feels like something out of a painting.

IMG_1249IMG_1263There are said to be over 10,000 torii at Fushimi Inari Taisha.

IMG_1429IMG_1437Nijō-jō is a castle that was built as a residence for the Tokugawa Shoguns when they took trips to see the Imperial Court. We were able to go inside the castle and view the gorgeous wall and ceiling paintings found throughout. The castle is also famous for its nightingale corridors that make gentle chirping sounds as you walk on the wooden floors.

IMG_1443Around the castle are gardens with meticulously composed stones.

IMG_1459IMG_1462The Philosopher’s Walk is a serene path lined with sakura that travels past many temples and shrines.

IMG_1370We were so fortunate to catch the sakura bloom at just the right time, but regardless of the season, Kyōto is wonderful. The city gave us a tranquil experience that was an interesting contrast to the high energy of Tōkyō.


Tokyo Disney Resort

IMG_1132A very important part of our Japan trip was visiting the Tokyo Disney Resort, and Tokyo DisneySea in particular. In our many years of Disney Parks fandom, we have read and heard so much about this park, and after seeing it, we can definitely say that some of the best work Walt Disney Imagineering has ever done lies within DisneySea.

IMG_1157So much of the park is about exploring on foot, rather than boarding ride vehicles. At Explorer’s Landing, there is so much to discover inside the fortress, as well as on the sailing ship docked outside.

IMG_7996We dined at Magellan’s Restaurant, which is part of the experience of Explorer’s Landing. In the center of the restaurant is this large globe that subtly rotates while diners enjoy their meal.

IMG_1117The fortress was built by the Society of Explorers and Adventurers, which is an organization that Imagineering has woven into many stories throughout the Disney Parks.

IMG_1148The story of the S.E.A. continues at Hotel Hightower, where a member of the organization has had a strange mishap with an elevator…

IMG_1085IMG_1140The scope of DisneySea is unimaginable. There is even an entire ocean liner inside of the park. We boarded the ship and had a drink at The Teddy Roosevelt Lounge.

IMG_6873We had so many fun treats at the parks, but the little green dumplings filled with mochi were definitely the cutest.

IMG_1067IMG_1161Mysterious Island is the base of Captain Nemo, and the home port of the Nautilus. It shares similarities with Discoveryland in Disneyland Paris, but it is much more extensive and provides a cohesive story.

IMG_1076James’ favorite ride in the park is Journey to the Center of the Earth, which he puts right up there with the Disneyland mountains.

IMG_1125Taking a relaxing gondola cruise through Mediterranean Harbor is a good way to rest your feet after so many great walkthrough attractions.

IMG_8758Casbah Food Court has many hidden away spots to escape the crowds.

IMG_1168Chandu the tiger is from my favorite attraction in the park, Sinbad’s Storybook Voyage. Its tone lies somewhere between it’s a small world and traditional dark rides. As soon as I saw this little plush I knew I had to bring him back home with me.

IMG_8054We stayed at the Tokyo Disneyland Hotel, which is right outside the gate of Tokyo Disneyland, similar to the Disneyland Hotel at Disneyland Paris.

IMG_1195Of all the troubled Tomorrowlands that we have visited, the Tokyo Disneyland version is the only one that we wouldn’t consider broken. It feels like it still has an identity and is not just a messy stylistic mashup.

IMG_1206James had looked at so many photos of this spot in Tomorrowland while working on various science fiction projects, and he was so excited to finally be there in person.

IMG_1215The exit for Star Tours that leads into the top level of Pan Galactic Pizza Port really feels like you’re in a spaceport and gives this Tomorrowland a sense of place.

IMG_1202Our favorite attraction in Tokyo Disneyland is Monsters, Inc. Ride & Go Seek. This was one of two attractions in the park that were highly recommended, but sadly the other, Pooh’s Hunny Hunt was closed.

IMG_1200The whimsy of the exterior of It’s a Small World flows seamlessly into Queen of Hearts Banquet Hall.

IMG_1181There are adorable homes for all sizes of critters in Grandma Sara’s Kitchen.

IMG_1227Visiting a new Disney park is such a thrill, and it’s always surreal to see slight variations on familiar attractions. Disneyland, USA will always be our favorite park, but Tokyo DisneySea certainly gives it  run for its money.

 


Our Little Garden

IMG_9885At the beginning of this summer, I wanted to find some room to plant some vegetables in our yard. Eventually we plan on having large wooden planters built, but for now, we are using a small strip of dirt on the side of the house.

IMG_9806There were some extra bricks lying around behind the garage, so we were able to use those to set up separate beds.

IMG_9815IMG_9805When deciding on what to plant, I went with vegetables I tend to use the most in my day to day cooking, such as peppers, tomatoes, squash, shallots, and a variety of herbs.

IMG_9875IMG_9959IMG_9876It’s fascinating to watch them grow from tiny buds into colorful delicious produce.

IMG_9878It can be very difficult to grow plants in the perpetual drought of southern California. Some of our vegetables started to cook when temperatures reached 110F. Others, like this cucumber, never grew larger than an inch. However, new cucumbers have started to grow, and we’re hopeful this batch will do better.

IMG_5138We haven’t had any squash fully grow yet, but we have several squash blossoms that we hope will yield fruit in the autumn. Though we’ve only harvested a small amount, it has been very exciting to cook with produce from my very own garden, and I’m certainly looking forward to expanding it in the future.


Hallway Wall Alcove

IMG_9953One of the most delightful touches in our home is a small wall alcove in the hallway near the guest room. After recently making some HVAC infrastructure changes on that wall, we went ahead with some ideas that we had been kicking around for painting the alcove.

IMG_9951The entire space had been the same color as the rest of the wall when we moved in, and we knew that we at least wanted to treat the wooden mantle section the same as the trim in the rest of the hallway. For the back face of the alcove, we decided to use a paint that was ever so slightly darker than the wall, but with a semi-gloss finish to provide a very subtle separation.

IMG_9952The main part of this project was creating a stencil that was similar to the one we used over our front door. The curved surface made this process a bit tricky.

IMG_9957The stenciled shapes are  just rough enough to feel right with the texture of our walls.

IMG_9955Small touches like these are the types of things that made us initially fall in love with this house, and it feels wonderful to be able to embellish upon it and make it our own.


Tortilla Soup

IMG_9648aThe weather in Southern California has been a bit chilly and intermittently rainy the past few days, making it ideal soup weather. I was craving something flavorful and hearty, without being too heavy, and tortilla soup quickly sprung to mind. I have been using this recipe for many years, and it is at the top of my comfort soups list. I love making a big batch of it on the weekend, and having some as a small side to meals throughout the week, or as a meal itself.

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Ingredients: 3 tomatillos, 3 ripe tomatoes, 1 red bell pepper, 3 guajillo chilis (seeds removed), 3 garlic cloves, 1 white onion, 1 cornish hen (or 1/2 chicken), 1 bay leaf, 3 sprigs thyme, 2.5 quarts water, 10 tortillas, 2 cups canola oil, salt and pepper to taste. Optional toppings: avocado, cilantro, shredded cheese.

Instructions: Pre-heat oven to 375F. Cut the tomatillos, tomatoes, bell pepper, chilis,  and onion into quarters and place on baking sheet along with whole garlic cloves. Roast in oven for 30 minutes, until all vegetables are soft and starting to brown. While vegetables roast, cut cornish hen (or chicken) into separate pieces, and put in large pot of water with bay leaf, thyme, and a dash of salt. Bring pot to a boil, and let simmer until hen is cooked through, about 15 minutes. Remove hen from pot, let cool, and shred meat off the bones using a fork.

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Cut the tortillas into thin strips. Heat canola oil in a pot, and add tortilla strips in batches, cooking until each batch is crispy. Remove each batch from hot oil and place on dish to cool.

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Remove roasted vegetables from oven, and let cool. Add all of the vegetables to a blender, along with some of the water from the pot, and a handful of tortilla strips, and blend until thoroughly liquified. Add the vegetable mixture back to the pot (you can do this by running it through a fine mesh sieve to avoid having too many seeds in the soup). Add the chicken back to the pot, and about 3/4 of the remaining tortilla strips, and bring back to a boil. Add salt and pepper to taste, and let simmer for at least 5 minutes. Serve hot with crispy tortilla strips, sliced avocado, cheese, and minced cilantro.

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