Coastal New England

IMG_5349On our visits to New England, we have taken many scenic drives along the rocky coastline, admiring the maritime character of the region. Growing up on Long Island Sound and Narragansett Bay, the water was always near, and although neither James nor I ever really sailed, the imagery of the sea was ever present. Here is a small collection of images we’ve taken over the past few trips that highlight the views of coastal New England.

IMG_6070IMG_0823The Conimicut Light in Rhode Island and the Spring Point Ledge Light in Maine are just some of the many lighthouses that dot the New England coast.

IMG_7530The rugged shoreline has claimed many vessels over the past few hundred years. What child in the area hasn’t thought of the treasures that they would find if they were able to explore one of these shipwrecks?

IMG_5302IMG_4760The most famous ship that made it safely to shore has got to be the Mayflower, and on Burial Hill in Plymouth, Massachusetts, you can visit the gravesites of the Pilgrims.

IMG_0726There are many beautiful historic cities in New England that have relied on the sea for their development, such as Portsmouth, New Hampshire.

IMG_0779IMG_0848Another city that prospered due to maritime commerce is Portland, Maine. The historical structures of the Old Port have been preserved and and now form a lively district of boutiques and restaurants.

IMG_9621All over the region are relics from the Industrial Revolution such as this rusting pipeline in Stamford, Connecticut.

IMG_5378The Mystic River Bascule Bridge in Connecticut is a drawbridge that is still operational. It’s fascinating to sit nearby and watch as the flow of vehicle and pedestrian traffic is periodically stopped for boats to pass through.

IMG_5336IMG_4795Anyone who really wants to experience what life on the New England coast was like over a century ago, needs to visit Mystic Seaport. There they can board the Charles W. Morgan, the only surviving wooden whaling ship in America.

IMG_9612When I see the rocky beaches of New England, I feel so much at home. It reminds me of the countless hours spent in my youth watching sailboats bobbing up and down while collecting sea shells from tide pools. I’m so glad that this is something that James experienced as a child as well, and that now we can rediscover it together.

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